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Stay focused. It takes time to launch a company, create brand awareness and start making money so it is important to stay focused on the short-term goals. Ever since the day we started, I’ve had a small whiteboard on my desk with short and mid-term goals, specific numbers to hit, and dates to hit them by. I look at it daily to drive my actions for the day. I’m happy to say that I consistently hit those goals and enjoy updating them regularly to keep pushing further toward our larger goals.

As part of my series about the leadership lessons of accomplished business leaders, I had the pleasure of interviewing Julie Leonhardt.


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You will never be ready, so go before you’re ready. It’s important to be prepared but work towards 80% ready and launch. You’ll never launch perfectly. It’s better to launch and learn. I did this with my first online course. While it financially wasn’t my most successful endeavor, I broke even and learned a ton.

As part of my series about the leadership lessons of accomplished business leaders, I had the pleasure of interviewing Jen Naye Herrmann.

Jen Naye Herrrmann is a ’40 under 40’ brand marketer turned content creator and marketing strategist. In 2015, she started a blog and grew a social media following. Three years later, she left her corporate world to take on brand partnerships and social media consulting. …


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I wish someone told me how to give feedback without letting negative feelings fester before I started leading my company. Festering negative feelings feels terrible! Giving direct feedback is scary and I wasn’t good at it. Thankfully, I read a book called the GREAT CEO WITHIN that provided a structure for gracefully providing feedback. It feels great to get those feelings off my chest every day in a way that’s helpful for productive

As part of my series about the leadership lessons of accomplished business leaders, I had the pleasure of interviewing David Lecko.

David Lecko is the CEO of DealMachine, an integrated, mobile-first platform for real estate investor lead generation. Whether it’s the CRM, Street Engine (driving for dollars), List engine, or Message engine (SMS), DealMachine has every tool investors need to scale, in one simple app.


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The ultimate success, or failure, of your organization originates at the top, and is a product of the decisions, or non-decisions, of the President. As important as it is to delegate, and to hire and interface with good, smart, intelligent people and colleagues, the buck stops with the person in charge. …


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Do more of what works. We all have behaviors that serve us, but often times we aren’t tuned into those things consciously, and more than that, we don’t lean into them when we need them most. For example, when we are tired after a long day, we may know that exercise gives us energy and mental clarity, but instead we reach for alcohol to soothe us. …


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Stay true to yourself: don’t let anyone or trend influence your room (if you are a masculine man who loves pink for your bedroom, go for it!)

As part of my series on the “5 Things You Can Do To Help Your Living Space Spark More Joy”, I had the pleasure of interviewing Jonathan Rachman.

San Francisco-based multi-hyphened creative, event planner to the elite and owner of Jonathan Rachman Designs adds author to his repertoire with the release of his memoir, The Garlic Peanut Story. …


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Open Your Heart to Receive — When you feel like you don’t measure up to someone else, you can do two things. First, survey your current clients, and ask them what they like best about doing business with you. And be open to receive the positive feedback. Second, review any testimonials or positive reviews that you have received in the past. …


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Never lose focus on the product and people (two types: customers and employees). When you’re running a business, there is SO much going on and an incredible amount of noise around you. Make sure that most of your time is spent on what is going to help grow the business: your product and your people.

It’s not just going to happen — execution is everything. Nothing will happen on it’s own, so you have to make it happen. And when things aren’t working, you just have to find a way.

As part of my series about the leadership lessons of accomplished business leaders, I had the pleasure of interviewing David Spratte, Co-Founder and CEO of Carpe, the reliable brand for effective antiperspirant products. In his early college years at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), David was diagnosed with hyperhidrosis and faced the new problem of uncontrollable sweating unrelated to heat or exercise. After a year of having ingredients shipped surreptitiously to David’s dorm rooms in an effort to solve his sweat problems, David and his friend and eventual business partner, Kasper Kubica, decided to test their own possible solutions. After creating and testing over 60 prototypes, they launched Carpe Antiperspirant Hand Lotion and their fight against embarrassing sweat began. Two years later, David graduated from UNC and Kasper graduated from Duke. David abandoned his medical school plans and in order to focus full-time on developing the Carpe brand. Today, alongside a quickly growing team of experts and passionate sweaters, David and Kasper spend nearly every one of their days developing new sweat-stopping products and reaching out to the people who need them most. David currently resides with his newlywed wife in Durham, North Carolina.


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Urgency and hard work are important, but assume you are running a marathon, not a sprint. Build work/life balance into your culture for yourself and your employees. Sustainability applies to businesses too, and to self-sustain both cash flow and creative energy flow are essential. Create a work-to-live culture vs. live-to-work.

As part of my series about the leadership lessons of accomplished business leaders, I had the pleasure of interviewing Eli Halliwell, co-founder and CEO of Hairstory, a company dedicated to helping people rethink everything about hair in a world where the old rules don’t apply. Eli has spent over 25 years building consumer businesses and his experience includes co-founding a consumer venture-backed technology startup (iMotors.com), building a growth business (Bumble and bumble) and re-energizing a turnaround (Jurlique). Prior to co-founding Hairstory, Eli spent five years investing in global consumer companies at D.E. …


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You are not the CEO because you are the best — you are the CEO because you know who the best is.

My old boss used to be proud that he knew enough about a lot to be dangerous. He could ask good questions to understand who was competent and once he trusted someone, he deferred to them. If I am doing my job right, I am not doing a lot, but building a team of great people that do their jobs well.

As part of my series about the leadership lessons of accomplished business leaders, I had the pleasure of interviewing Neil Grosscup, CEO and Master Blender of Tanteo Tequila, which offers an innovative line of all-natural, 100% agave tequilas made in partnership with the local farmer cooperative in the small town of Juanacatlán, Jalisco.

About

Candice Georgiadis

Candice Georgiadis is an active mother of three as well as a designer, founder, social media expert, and philanthropist.

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